Bio 31234 Anthropological Genomics (Spring 2014)

Bio 31234 Anthropological Genomics (Spring 2014) – 3 credits; Tue 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM (location MR 506); Prerequisite: Bio 206 or equivalent

Professor Mike Hickerson; Office: MR 835; Email: mhickerson ‘at’ ccny.cuny.edu ; Office Hours: Tue 2:30 – 4:30

Teaching Assistant: Alexander Xue; Lab MR 813; Office Hours: Tue 1:00 – 3:00; Email: xanderxue@gmail.com

Syllabus/Schedule 

Midterm Exam: March 11th

Final Exam – May 20th 8 AM – 10:15 AM room MR506 

Lectures:

Lecture 1 Jan 28th

Lecture 2 Feb 4th

Lecture_3 Feb 11th

Lecture 4_Feb 18th

Lecture5_Feb 25th

Lecture6 March 3rd

Lecture 7&8 March 18th and April 1rst

Lecture 9 April29th

Lecture 10_May 6

Lecture 11_May13th

March 25th – Computer Lab Exercise (your Nat. Geo Results – bring your GPID)

Assigned readings and activities:

Feb 4th – Dudley & Karczewski “Practical and ethical considerations in personal genomics” – Discussion (3 students randomly chosen to lead discussion)

Feb 11th (Jobling Chapter 4)

Feb 18th (Jobling Chapter 5); short quiz; discuss “Selling Roots” article by Eliot Aguilar (http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/selling-roots/).  – three people chosen randomly to lead discussions

Feb 25th (Jobling Chapter 6): Discuss two articles: 1 “Which Grandparent are You Most Related to?” by Razib Khan  & 2. “Genomic variation in sharing between siblings” by Graham Coop. – Three people will be chosen randomly to lead discussions

March 3rd Phylogenetics Workshop

March 18th Go over Midterm exam

March 25th – Computer Lab Exercise (your Nat. Geo Results – bring your GPID)

April 8th Jobling Chapter 10 & Quiz #2 (starting at 9:30 AM). Computer Lab exercise (Predicting height with SNPs; Bring your Nat. Geo Login information)

April 29th Jobling Chapters 11

May 6th Jobling Chapter 12; Bring your Nat. Geo – we will “paint our chromosomes” using Xander’s method

My 13th Bring your Nat. Geo – we will “paint our chromosomes” using Xander’s method (part 2)

Final Exam – May 20th 8 AM – 10:15 AM room MR506

Anthropological Genomics:  This course explores how our genes can be used to understand human history, ancestry and evolution. The goal of the course is to explore how genes can inform us about human history, ancestry and evolution while allowing students the option to participate by collecting genetic data from their own genome. We now have the ability to cheaply and quickly obtain large amounts of DNA sequence data and undoubtedly we will soon be drowning in our own genomic data with little knowledge about how to interpret it, manage it, and protect it. Therefore an added goal of this course is practical whereby students will learn the bioinformatics skills for handling and analyzing human population genetic data (as well as learn about the history of their own ancestors). Understanding how genetic data can be combined with independent information to become a powerful and fascinating tool for uncovering events in human history, reconstructing human ancestry, and understanding human evolution will be the focus of the course. The genetic data collected from students who volunteer (the normal $199.95 fee will be paid for by NSF grant DEB 1253710) will also personalize the concepts in genetics, human history, anthropology, ethics, bioinformatics, quantitative reasoning and information literacy.

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